Stream of Consciousness Sunday: All About Dads

It’s Father’s Day. Let’s face it. There are a lot of dad issues out there. It just seems that it’s easier to find a good mom than it is to find a good dad. So do we really even need them? I gave some thought to my own dad and to my husband, the father of my son. And I let the words flow about what a good dad really should be.

Today’s (Optional) Writing Prompt: Talk about fatherhood: your father, your husband as a father, yourself as a father. How important is it and the impact on our children?

Here we go…

stream of consciousness Sunday

When it comes to Father’s Day, I have so many mixed emotions. I think that part of it is because of my own relationship with my father, which has been good, bad, up, down, on again, off again, and neutral. We’re in a good phase but the road that it’s taken to get here will never wash away.

I tend to see a lot of the same patterns with dads. I don’t know if it’s just coincidence with the people I know or if somehow I surround myself with people who happen to have similar backgrounds. Basically, it’s hard to find a good dad. And what makes him good?

He has to be present. I know that sounds like a no-brainer but he doesn’t just have to be physically present, but he always has to be mentally and emotionally present. That’s really, really hard for a lot of men in this country. For some reason, it’s tough for American men to give hugs and say I love you, even when it is for their children.

He has to be strong. Not a strong man, but a pillar a strength. He needs to set an example of how a man can take care of his family, even if he may not be the breadwinner. He is the protector and provider and children need to feel safe when dad is around.

He has to be fun. It’s inevitable that moms have to deal with the day to day. Reminding kids to brush their teeth, pick up their toys, watch their mouth, eat their peas. And while kids love, love, love some mommy time, something about time with Daddy is different. It’s special. It’s memorable.

Most importantly, a dad needs to understand that he is needed and wanted and loved.

This was my 5 minute Stream of Consciousness Sunday post. It’s five minutes of your time and a brain dump. Want to try it? Here are the rules…

  • Set a timer and write for 5 minutes.
  • Write an intro to the post if you want but don’t edit the post. No proofreading or spellchecking. This is writing in the raw.
  • Publish it somewhere. Anywhere. The back door to your blog if you want. But make it accessible.
  • Add the Stream of Consciousness Sunday badge to your post.
  • Link up your post below.
  • Visit your fellow bloggers and show some love.

Now…

1. Grab the button

(it’s over in the sidebar)

2. Write your post.

3. Link up here.

  • JulieJordanScott2

    This one meant a lot to me, Fadra. I added a couple photos… don’t like to break rules but I had to do it!

    • FadraN

      I’m fine with rule-breaking. Looking forward to reading it!

  • http://guerrillamom.blogspot.com/ Guerrilla Mom

    Yes, Daddy time is different- I’m already learning that.  Although I’m the one that sets all of the little rules, Lucien’s father has a much easier time enforcing them!  I’m convinced it’s the deep voice.  I should work on that…

    • FadraN

      It will ebb and flow. Mom can be the lovemeister or authoritarian. And they’ll still love us just as much.

  • a.eye

    Hard and yet easy to write this one… thanks for the prompt.

    • FadraN

      I agree. SO much more I could have said!

  • http://rediscoveringdomesticity.com/ Audra Michelle

    It’s amazing what an impact our fathers have on our lives – they touch every aspect of our lives for good or for bad.

    • FadraN

      Exactly. I don’t think fathers realize their impact.

  • http://bungalow56.blogspot.in/ Dana

    A great list.  I think there are more of them out there then we think.  I always enjoy your meme when I happen to think of it on a Saturday evening.  Thank you for hosting.

    • FadraN

      I hope there are more than I think. But I do think that poor or absent fathering is an epidemic in this country.

  • cait

    Fathers are irreplacable!! It’s not father’s day over in my corner of the world (we have ours in september here in australia), but what a great reminder! And such a special post. I am so lucky to have always had such a great dad…

    ~cait~
    from notebooksisters.blogspot.com

    • FadraN

      I’m glad you have a good dad. Truly. They aren’t always easy to come by!